Old Lee Highway Multimodal Improvements

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Old Lee Highway is a special place within the city; there are a variety of land uses along the corridor including three schools, the city’s public library, the community center and police department, a large and beloved city park, churches, the Historic Blenheim, and multiple residential neighborhoods, along with commercial offerings anchoring both ends of the street at Fairfax Circle and Old Town Fairfax.

The corridor is already multimodal in nature, which means there are multiple ways people use to get around, including driving, CUE Bus, walking, biking, and even riding scooters. However, there is tremendous opportunity to improve the look, feel, safety, and function of the entire corridor, and transform it into a best-in-class multimodal street in the City of Fairfax, and in the region.

In 2015, the City of Fairfax completed a conceptual plan for Old Lee Highway. Conceptual planning took about six months and included extensive public involvement. The result was a recommended concept for the corridor that includes separated bicycle lanes, upgraded pedestrian and transit amenities, and improved lighting, landscaping, and buffering.

Project Goals

The redesigned Old Lee Highway corridor will:

  • Improve safety and comfort for all roadway users;
  • Provide continuous multimodal connections from Old Town Fairfax to Fairfax Circle;
  • Promote alternatives to driving for people accessing the library, community center, three schools, and commercial properties along the corridor; and
  • Reduce impervious surface area by nearly an acre.
  • Maintain Old Lee Highway as a special place within the city and as a gateway into the city

Major decisions agreed upon by City Council include:

  • Maintaining existing travel lanes;
  • Maintaining existing turning lane locations;
  • Adding bicycle and pedestrian infrastructure; and
  • Locating bicycle lanes on north side of roadway only.

Old Lee Highway Reimagined

The project is now in the preliminary engineering phase, and plans are approximately 15 percent complete. City staff are developing an engineered plan that includes the recommended components from the conceptual planning process. Feedback from the community emphasized a desire for better pedestrian and bicycle amenities, and landscaping buffers. Care is being taken to minimize impacts to private property and trees.

When complete, Old Lee Highway will feature:

  • Two-way, 10-foot bicycle track and a shared-use path on the north side of the road;
  • Continuous five-foot sidewalk on the south side;
  • Consolidated crossing locations with consistent signage;
  • Reduced crossing widths on side streets;
  • Upgraded bus stops and shelters throughout the project area; and
  • Improved lighting, landscaping, and buffering.

Stakeholder Advisory Group

City staff members are working together with an early-engagement stakeholder advisory group to provide input on the preliminary plans and various concepts the city is considering. The stakeholder advisory group includes 18 volunteers from the various stakeholder entities along the corridor. There are representatives from the Preserve at Great Oaks, Historic Blenheim, Great Oaks, Old Lee Hills, St. Leo’s. Fairfax HS, Country Club Hills, Daniels Run ES, Christian Science Church, Army Navy Country Club, City Council, Daniels Run Peace Church, City School Board, Farrcroft, and the Parks and Recreation Advisory Board. The city asked each group to select one person to represent his/her group.

Cost and Funding

The estimated project cost is $25.2 million. Funding sources include state revenue sharing ($10 million), regional Northern Virginia Transportation Authority funding ($13 million), and the city’s commercial and industrial tax ($2 million) – a fund dedicated to increasing transportation capacity. Construction is tentatively scheduled to start in spring 2023.

Public Engagement to Date

  • May 2014: TLC project endorsement to develop a conceptual plan for a redesigned multimodal Old Lee Highway. View presentation.
  • October 2014: Resolution of endorsement to request $2M in FY16 Revenue Sharing funding for Old Lee Highway. View presentation.
  • Feb 2015: City Council work session – TLC project kick off with Council. View presentation.
  • March 2015: Public Meeting 1 for TLC project
  • June 2015: City Council work session to review public input from first public meeting and review conceptual alternatives for second public meeting. View presentation.
  • June 2015: Public Meeting 2 for TLC Project
  • May 2016: Award of contract for $148,978 to complete Phase I engineering to perform survey and develop typical sections for each segment of the project based on concept developed through TLC project. The goal of this effort was identify property and environmental impacts associated with the preferred concept plan and develop an approximate project cost and schedule. View presentation.
  • October 2017: Resolution of support for City’s FY 19/20 Revenue Sharing application for $5M in funding for OLH. View presentation.
  • November 2017: Resolution of support for City’s FY 18-23 NVTA 70% application for $5M in funding for OLH. View presentation.
  • Nov 2018 work session: Provided project update (showed renderings). View presentation.
  • Jan 2019: Award of contract for $815,731 to complete Phase II engineering to perform more detailed engineering work to develop 30% and then 50% plans. Approved unanimously. View presentation.
  • July 2019 work session: Discussion of design options (facilities on one or both sides) and utility relocation options. View presentation.
  • September 2019: Resolution of support for City’s FY 19-24 NVTA 70% application for $8M in funding for OLH. View presentation.
  • September 2019: Resolution of support for City’s FY 20/21 Revenue Sharing application for $3M in funding for OLH. View presentation.
  • July 2020 work session: Provided project update and requested go-ahead to proceed with stakeholder advisory group. View presentation.

Old Lee Highway is a special place within the city; there are a variety of land uses along the corridor including three schools, the city’s public library, the community center and police department, a large and beloved city park, churches, the Historic Blenheim, and multiple residential neighborhoods, along with commercial offerings anchoring both ends of the street at Fairfax Circle and Old Town Fairfax.

The corridor is already multimodal in nature, which means there are multiple ways people use to get around, including driving, CUE Bus, walking, biking, and even riding scooters. However, there is tremendous opportunity to improve the look, feel, safety, and function of the entire corridor, and transform it into a best-in-class multimodal street in the City of Fairfax, and in the region.

In 2015, the City of Fairfax completed a conceptual plan for Old Lee Highway. Conceptual planning took about six months and included extensive public involvement. The result was a recommended concept for the corridor that includes separated bicycle lanes, upgraded pedestrian and transit amenities, and improved lighting, landscaping, and buffering.

Project Goals

The redesigned Old Lee Highway corridor will:

  • Improve safety and comfort for all roadway users;
  • Provide continuous multimodal connections from Old Town Fairfax to Fairfax Circle;
  • Promote alternatives to driving for people accessing the library, community center, three schools, and commercial properties along the corridor; and
  • Reduce impervious surface area by nearly an acre.
  • Maintain Old Lee Highway as a special place within the city and as a gateway into the city

Major decisions agreed upon by City Council include:

  • Maintaining existing travel lanes;
  • Maintaining existing turning lane locations;
  • Adding bicycle and pedestrian infrastructure; and
  • Locating bicycle lanes on north side of roadway only.

Old Lee Highway Reimagined

The project is now in the preliminary engineering phase, and plans are approximately 15 percent complete. City staff are developing an engineered plan that includes the recommended components from the conceptual planning process. Feedback from the community emphasized a desire for better pedestrian and bicycle amenities, and landscaping buffers. Care is being taken to minimize impacts to private property and trees.

When complete, Old Lee Highway will feature:

  • Two-way, 10-foot bicycle track and a shared-use path on the north side of the road;
  • Continuous five-foot sidewalk on the south side;
  • Consolidated crossing locations with consistent signage;
  • Reduced crossing widths on side streets;
  • Upgraded bus stops and shelters throughout the project area; and
  • Improved lighting, landscaping, and buffering.

Stakeholder Advisory Group

City staff members are working together with an early-engagement stakeholder advisory group to provide input on the preliminary plans and various concepts the city is considering. The stakeholder advisory group includes 18 volunteers from the various stakeholder entities along the corridor. There are representatives from the Preserve at Great Oaks, Historic Blenheim, Great Oaks, Old Lee Hills, St. Leo’s. Fairfax HS, Country Club Hills, Daniels Run ES, Christian Science Church, Army Navy Country Club, City Council, Daniels Run Peace Church, City School Board, Farrcroft, and the Parks and Recreation Advisory Board. The city asked each group to select one person to represent his/her group.

Cost and Funding

The estimated project cost is $25.2 million. Funding sources include state revenue sharing ($10 million), regional Northern Virginia Transportation Authority funding ($13 million), and the city’s commercial and industrial tax ($2 million) – a fund dedicated to increasing transportation capacity. Construction is tentatively scheduled to start in spring 2023.

Public Engagement to Date

  • May 2014: TLC project endorsement to develop a conceptual plan for a redesigned multimodal Old Lee Highway. View presentation.
  • October 2014: Resolution of endorsement to request $2M in FY16 Revenue Sharing funding for Old Lee Highway. View presentation.
  • Feb 2015: City Council work session – TLC project kick off with Council. View presentation.
  • March 2015: Public Meeting 1 for TLC project
  • June 2015: City Council work session to review public input from first public meeting and review conceptual alternatives for second public meeting. View presentation.
  • June 2015: Public Meeting 2 for TLC Project
  • May 2016: Award of contract for $148,978 to complete Phase I engineering to perform survey and develop typical sections for each segment of the project based on concept developed through TLC project. The goal of this effort was identify property and environmental impacts associated with the preferred concept plan and develop an approximate project cost and schedule. View presentation.
  • October 2017: Resolution of support for City’s FY 19/20 Revenue Sharing application for $5M in funding for OLH. View presentation.
  • November 2017: Resolution of support for City’s FY 18-23 NVTA 70% application for $5M in funding for OLH. View presentation.
  • Nov 2018 work session: Provided project update (showed renderings). View presentation.
  • Jan 2019: Award of contract for $815,731 to complete Phase II engineering to perform more detailed engineering work to develop 30% and then 50% plans. Approved unanimously. View presentation.
  • July 2019 work session: Discussion of design options (facilities on one or both sides) and utility relocation options. View presentation.
  • September 2019: Resolution of support for City’s FY 19-24 NVTA 70% application for $8M in funding for OLH. View presentation.
  • September 2019: Resolution of support for City’s FY 20/21 Revenue Sharing application for $3M in funding for OLH. View presentation.
  • July 2020 work session: Provided project update and requested go-ahead to proceed with stakeholder advisory group. View presentation.

Comments

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The two-way cycle track should be maintained from Great Oaks to Ridge Ave, instead of switching to a shared-use path. With that big hill there it seems dangerous to mix bicyclists who may be traveling down hill quite fast with pedestrians.

Is there any way to reduce the width of the thru car lanes? On the plan they are noted as 13.5 wide, which seems very wide for a street through a primarily residential area. Narrower lane widths would help reduce the excessive car speeds along Old Lee Highway.

Jen B. 3 days ago

Hello and thanks for letting us know clearly what you intend.

Why must you cut the beautiful trees at Fairfax HS. What will you replace them with?
Where will the plantings of Virginia native trees, shrubs and perennials be and what will be included.

Why must you narrow the exits on streets at OLH? No one will be able to sneak around cars waiting to make left turns. This is aggravating. We need to exit and enter neighborhoods expeditiously. Please explain as this is a safety and quality of life issue for those who live here. Emergency vehicles?

The project does sound beautiful. How many years will it take to complete and do we really have to endure 1 lane only to get in and out of the place. Can you close Old Lee Hwy to those who do not live here or have business here?

Respectfully, but with some doubt,
Mary Gaeta
9815 McLearen Ct.
703-273-7749

What is this? 14 days ago

As a new resident to the city (life long Virginian) I would greatly appreciate the addition of a continuous bike lane from the Circle (where I live) all the way to/through Old Town - glad to see there are plans to implement it.

Bromari 15 days ago

I am a 25 plus year resident of Old Lee Hills. This plan will likely ruin Old Lee Hwy, as did the traffic flow changes made in the Old Town area of Fairfax City years ago. I also realize this is all a done deal, and nothing can be changed at this point, however, I must insist that overhead power lines along Old Lee Hwy be installed underground in conjunction with the rest of this project. Other commenters have noted this as well. Too often, power lines on Old Lee Hwy are downed or damaged during storms, and we residents are without power for periods of time ranging from hours to days. With the current climate changes we are experiencing, we are also experiencing a greater incidence of severe storms. This is not going stop. This period of road and land demolition/construction would be the most logical time to address this long time problem. I know it is doubtful anyone will ever read my comments or give consideration to installing utility lines underground, but I felt I had to try.
Ann G.

Ann G. 16 days ago

.

NativeResident 16 days ago

Dear Mayor and Council,
If you worked as hard at lowering our real estate taxes as you do trying to fix what isn't broken on OLH, this would be a better place to live. Then, we could all go back to living our lives in peace instead of worrying about what natural habitats you are going to destroy and boneheaded ideas you will come up with next. Can't you just run the city well, lower taxes and stop wasting taxpayer money "reimagining" OLH out of existence? #SaveOldLeeHighway

NativeResident 16 days ago

I’d love to see both the legal and actual speed on OLH dropped to 25 or less, to reduce the frequency and severity of cars striking pedestrians. If this reduces the number of commuters using it, so be it. If this requires installing multiple roundabouts, good. Power lines aren’t a road project, let ratepayers pay for that.

City residents won’t have their trips impacted by taking an additional :30 seconds on their trip.

Roundabouts would reduce delta caused by waiting for a left-turner to get their break in traffic, especially if a median curb were installed.

Sean 16 days ago

As I have indicated a few times in previous forums, my home on Old Lee Highway has a unique consideration which requires us to have clear communication from and discussion with the City. Some preliminary plans, if finalized, would render our home unmarketable to residential buyers, with a likely financial impact to us of hundreds of thousands of dollars. We request the City contact us so we can get confirmation that we will not be impacted to this extent. Thanks.

Don Insley 28 days ago

I have left feedback before and will definitely attend 9/30. I still find the plans unacceptable. Too many mature trees destroyed. The beauty of our neighborhood destroyed. Not enough thought on traffic flow. This project should improve that NOT slow things down even more causing traffic nightmares and unsafe travel for students.

CK about 1 month ago

Note: I apologize if this is a duplicate, but your screen didn't seem to accept my previous attempts at a comment.

From a discussion I attended yesterday evening at St. Leo's Rectory, I am even more strongly of the view that Old Lee Highway should largely be left alone. Yes, it has lots of problems. But I don't see the proposed changes as solving any of these problems. And they are almost certain to make their own problems.

I absolutely agree with Casey Duffy's observations on the impact of having no place (such as in front of his house) for trucks and buses to pull out of the main traffic stream. To get rid of such existing extra lanes is beyond common sense.

And some of the issues are even more fundamental. For example, I don't see any reasonable way to make Old Lee Highway safer for bicyclists. It is a very old road and wasn't designed with that objective in mind, and I don't see any kind of retrofit that will accomplish that while allowing it to be effective in its general objective of facilitating vehicular transportation. Sorry, but you really can't have it both ways.

I think the idea of a roundabout is a poor one - yes, they look kind of cute, but my experience is that they seldom (if ever) are effective at anything other than creating a barrier to speed (but at what a price). However, the discussion on having one at that intersection near Arties did seem to make good sense. That merge-to-nothing road structure at that spot, and the loop-around behavior of many motorists, has, I'm sure (and know from personal experience), caused numerous accidents (and close-calls).

Another BIG point: The notion that the construction - ANY construction - would involve an extended period of episodic one-way traffic on Old Lee Highway, is just too stupid to seriously contemplate (regardless of any alleged benefits).

That said, I WOULD - STRONGLY - support burying the power lines along OLHwy. Yesterday we had another extended (10 hours for my neighborhood) outage. This happens with depressing frequency. I've spoken repeatedly to David Meyer (cc'd above) about this, but nothing seems to happen (even though he is personally impacted about the same as is my own family). Most of the time the outage seems to stem from a problem with the line running along Old Lee Highway.

Terry Steichen 2 months ago

Removed by moderator.

Terry Steichen 2 months ago

Removed by moderator.

Terry Steichen 2 months ago

Please no roundabouts on Old Lee Hwy. This road is congested enough during prime drive time (morning and evening). Roundabouts will simply hold up traffic more and make it impossible for those residents in Old Lee Hills and Country Club Hills to get out of their neighborhoods. I’m a CCH resident and intersections are blocked continually; people who pay no attention to the “no blocking intersections” law are certainly not going to pay attention to not blocking the exit in a roundabout. Add busses stopping and kids crossing and it simply is a recipe for disaster. Those roundabouts look pretty but not everything that looks pretty is worth having. Please vote this item down.
If you want more control on the road consider 1 traffic light mid way down Old Lee. Residents on both sides could exit there when the traffic is bad and it could go flashing yellow during low times like the City already does.

Lee Faber 2 months ago

As a resident of Country Club Hills, I had reserved judgement on use of roundabouts, and had formally provided concerns that have never been properly addressed. After observing the work session on July 6th, I conclude that they do not add value for the priorities of this project. Therefore, the added costs and negative aspects, including adverse safety impacts, are not warranted. Details supporting my conclusion are provided below.

Project Objectives: At the beginning of earnest effort for this improvement project in 2015, the top priorities were enhancements for pedestrians, bicycles, landscaping, and buffers and there was no indication of adding roundabouts. The addition of roundabouts came after anecdotal feedback on the difficulty of access to Old Lee Highway from neighborhood streets. However, as presented in the July 6th Work Session, the amount of vehicles accessing Old Lee Highway from the neighborhoods is “very low” which makes the value added for this purpose highly questionable.

Safety:
It has been stated that roundabouts provide a large safety improvement against severe T-bone and head-on collisions. However, this improvement is being cited out of context. Specifically, this improvement is associated with use of roundabouts to replace traffic lights and in major intersections where there can be high speed and high volume traffic in both directions. This is not the case for Old Lee Highway making this safety claim irrelevant. During the July 6th Work Session, a question was asked concerning how many of these severe accidents have occurred on Old Lee Highway and no answer could be provided indicating that this claimed safety improvement has not been seriously substantiated.

Further, there are adverse implications for safety. Bicycle and pedestrian safety is affected because the roundabout provides less shoulder room for the interface between bikers and pedestrians. In addition, there is the adverse impact to emergency response, especially during rush periods, when the roundabout will cause traffic backups. This concern is expressed in the 2005 Old Lee Highway Transportation Study but is absent in current discussions.

Consequently, there is insufficient improvement in safety, as well as adverse safety impacts, making the increased cost (estimated in the July 6th Work Session to be about $1/2 million) and adverse impact to traffic congestion unwarranted. Further, there are several areas of the corridor that could benefit from increased safety measures, such as small optimized turning bays or other judicious features that would mitigate safety concerns such as rear-end collisions that are applicable to Old Lee Highway. It is noted that small judicious turning bays were included in the 2005 Old Lee Highway Transportation Study. The resources saved from not using roundabouts could be used for these features or other features consistent with the priorities of the project.

Traffic Congestion:
At the July 6th Work Session, it was stated that traffic backups are not expected. However, no details were provided to substantiate this counterintuitive assertion, such as traffic volume compared to roundabout capacity and the specific traffic volume used compared to the 2019 VDOT estimate of 17 vehicles per minute. Design guidance for use of roundabouts, such as NCHRP REPORT 672 Subscriber Categories Highways • Design Roundabouts: An Informational Guide, specifically warns that undesired delays to major movement traffic may result. The assertion that undesirable traffic backups will not occur, in the absence of details demonstrating this, is simply not credible.

At the July 6th Work Session, a comparison was made between the alternative of turning lanes to roundabouts showing a $1/2 million increase in cost for land acquisition and construction. The turning lane option consisted of 400 foot long turning lanes to include large tapers characterized as “proper.” While such large tapers may be proper for some roadways, they are grossly inordinately large for this application of low turning volume and speed. There are numerous small properly functioning turning lanes less than 100 feet in the City for roads of higher speed and turning volume. Therefore, this comparison is not valid.

In summary, the benefits of roundabouts for the Old Lee Highway Improvement Project are marginal at best and do not warrant the increased cost and associated negative performance for this project that has limited resources. The additional resources for roundabouts should be invested in judicious features that are consistent with the priorities for this project.

Stephen Rodgers

Steve & Patty 3 months ago

I am concerned with the lack of community engagement in the City of Fairfax, especially with the Old Lee Highway Multimodal Improvement Project. I understand that this project stems from a 2005 Transportation Study and really kicked off in 2015. From materials online, I see that there were 2 public workshops (2015) and a Stakeholder Advisory Committee from September 2020 - to February 2021.

Most recently, in the July 6th Council Work Session, the Staff recommended that the council plan to approve roundabouts for this project at the July 13th Regular Council Meeting. The staff cited they were being added in response to resident feedback from the Country Club Hills and Old Lee Hills residents. The Council did not agree with this recommendation and questioned the validity of the resident feedback, whether the roundabouts are consistent with the project objectives, and voiced other concerns about whether roundabouts are appropriate for Old Lee Highway. Via social media, all CCH and OLH residents were invited to provide their opinion on roundabouts at the July 13th Council Regular Meeting. More than 10 Country Club Hills and Old Lee Hill residents spoke in opposition to roundabouts. No one spoke in favor of roundabouts. Earlier this week, I was forwarded a message form the Old Lee Hills Civic Association in which Council Member Ross stated: "On July 13, we received a substantial amount of public comments at our meeting (as well as emails) mainly expressing opposition to the roundabout, especially at the intersection of Old Lee Highway and Country Hill Drive. While no final decision has been made by City Council, I do not believe there is any support for this concept." Prior to this time, Council Member Ross was a vocal proponent of roundabouts for this project.

Further, the advance notice of the intent to approve roundabouts was inadequate in that it only appeared in the Staff Report that was listed as a “Status Update” in the Work Session Agenda shortly before the meeting. I note this approval would have occurred prior to the design public hearing scheduled for some time in 2021.

Aside from the unanswered technical questions concerning use of roundabouts on Old Lee Highway, this indicates that the basis of resident feedback was highly flawed and that there was no effort to inform the public of the intended approval action.

Of the City's 23,531 residents, how many of them were engaged and provided feedback on the Old Lee Highway Multimodal Improvement Project? And how many were of the 3,300 residents (2,260 age 18+) that live along Old Lee Highway? I see from documents online, that the attendance from the first and second workshops were 135 and 36 people, respectively. An online survey captured 137 responses. At the most (if each person and survey were unique) this equals 278 participants or 1.2% of the City's 23,531 residents.

The Stakeholder Advisory Committee composed of 18 representatives, including a school board and city council member, operated for only 5-months and during a pandemic. I live in Old Lee Hills and never once heard from anyone on this project. How were these "stakeholders" selected? Did the City select each individual, or could residents apply to be on the committee? Did the selected members represent the demographics of the community?

Besides online surveys, staffing a booth at the Fall Festival, newsletter articles, what other active engagement has the city conducted to understand: 1) how residents use Old Lee Highway, 2) what issues exist, and 3) how the community envisions their neighborhoods (especially those living along Old Lee Highway).

It seems pretty clear that the community has NOT been adequately engaged. For a $25 million project, there should have been continued and active engagement with residents -- not social media and online surveys.

Genuine community engagement is not difficult, it just takes time. I enjoy living in the City and I care enough to write you this message. I want to see the City continue to grow and be an inclusive community that works together with the local government.

Elizabeth 3 months ago

I have lived on Old Lee Hwy (OLH) for 3 years and have walked along OLH daily for the past 18 years. To those that say a roundabout will snarl traffic in the morning and afternoons around Fairfax High School have never driven or walked around FHS in the morning or afternoon. Traffic often backs up past my house (between Queen Anne and Brookwood) in the morning, and before Great Oaks in the afternoon. It’s just what happens in the morning/afternoon around the school. A roundabout won’t hurt or help the situation.

To those who want turn lanes to improve the “flow” of traffic don’t live or walk along OLH, as speeds of unimpeded cars often top 50 MPH. Speeding has always bee a serious problem on OLH and creating ways to improve the flow of traffic will only exacerbate the problem. At a minimum, there needs to be raised crosswalks (a speed hump, NOT a speed bump) to make cars slow down to somewhere close to the speed limit (30 MPH). Ever tried to cross at a current crosswalk? Good luck with that!

Another way to reduce speeds that is used in surrounding cities and counties is digital radar speed signs that shows your speed as you approach the sign. Of course, the best speed deterrent would be speed cameras. I know City Council has voted to use temporary speed cameras around the schools, but permanent speed cameras would be best. I realize many believe speed cameras and red light cameras mainly target indigent people, but the type of cars I see speeding daily on OLH are not owned by poor people.

Raised crosswalks, digital radar speed signs and speed cameras. NO turn lanes. We need to slow down, not improve the flow of traffic on OLH.

Robert Thoensen 3 months ago

I don't understand what problems the proposed traffic circle would fix. It doesn't seem like a good idea to me, but I'm not unalterably opposed to traffic circles. I just don't understand the need, and how the proposed circle would improve things. Please tell me how I can see the work that was done to identify the problems and come up with the proposal. Thanks.

balserak 3 months ago

Dear Mayor and Council -

I'm opposed to rotary/circles on Old Lee Highway. They are a solution looking for a problem that does not exist, but if this effort is pursued it will create more problems. In fact, the rotary/circles as proposed would be a hindrance to traffic flow and will just cause more backups on OLH. Traffic circles are inherently slower for throughput. To see how traffic circles do NOT work, go to the circles that they have in Oakton or in Vienna. They are not efficient or effective in increasing the flow of traffic. And that should be the focus of any plan - how to make vehicle traffic flow better safely, not create bottlenecks.

It seems, too, that based on the comments here and in conversations there is little to no support for these circles in the affected neighborhoods. Hence, why pursue something that constituents in these neighborhoods do not want, much less impacting traffic flow for everyone else who uses the road (other Fairfax City residents, visitors)? It makes no sense.

This project is also a waste of taxpayer money. I must say I'm disappointed that the City continues to push unneeded, wasteful projects just because we can "find the money" and falls for the old chestnut that "someone else will use the money." Maybe so, maybe not, but let's not continue to spend taxpayer money when it isn't necessary.

Thank you for your time and service.

Best regards,
Dan Drummond

Dan Drummond 3 months ago

As a 22 year city resident and the old Lee Hills neighborhood, I am against adding a rotary/circle on Old Lee hwy and Country Hill. . This proposed circle or rotary will cause so many problems for traffic on Old Lee Highway it will be a parking lot in the mornings, dropping off at school, after school and in the evenings, leaving us residents of Old Lee Hills the inability to get to work, to pick up the kids from school, or to make a timely kid’s sporting event. Despite the concern, which is my opinion, the City staff have not provided the Council with the proper information (traditional traffic studies) to validate traffic congestion issues, and other alternative options for the Council to make the proper decision for our Community. It is important to note that the Work session last week, City staff did not understand how the traffic works in the mornings at the High School and at Daniels Run and demonstrated a complete lack of understanding of conditions on this road during times when we as citizens need it most. These are the people designing the one road we as citizens of Old Lee Hills to conduct our lives safely and efficiently. It is important to this rotary has no bearing on the bike lanes or improved sidewalks and based on the review and analysis done by our neighbor in Country Club Hills the rotary will make those features less safe for the kids and families of Old Lee Hills. The City staff has not addressed the safety, congestion, and traffic flow considerations the rotary will bring to our neighborhood. Not in favor of a circle or rotary anywhere of old Lee hwy. Thank you for your time and attention.

Daphne Moore 3 months ago

Dear Mayor and Councilmembers

I am a resident home owner on Colony Road in the Old Lee Hills/Old Post neighborhood.

I am strongly opposed to the roundabouts proposed on Old Lee Highway and Country Hill Drive.
I see them as detrimental to the safe and efficient access and use of OLH, and unnecessarily expensive and disruptive for our neighborhood and our City.

I would propose alternatives including 1) SPEED HUMPS that are used on Sager Ave and Burke Station Road. 2) SPEED INDICATORS that show vehicle current speed with warning to slow down 3) CROSS WALK ROADWAY POSTS- flexible warnings at road crossings that are installed to the roadway on the centerlines.
These are COMMON, COST EFFECTIVE, and EFFECTIVE to improve safe speed control.
Thank you.
Eric J.

Eric J 3 months ago
Page last updated: 01 October 2021, 07:30