Connecting Fairfax City's Past and Present to Build a More Equitable and Inclusive Future

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On July 12, 2022, City Council voted to change the names of 14 streets as recommended by the Stakeholder Advisory Group. Watch the meeting.

UPDATE July 12, 2022: City Council voted to change 14 street names. Watch the meeting. If you would like to submit names for consideration, please complete the survey

Connecting Fairfax City for All

The City of Fairfax recognizes there is strength in diversity and acknowledges the need for a broader community conversation around the issues of racial and social equity, systemic racism, symbolism, and identity.

Confederate Lane and Plantation Pkwy signsNomenclature in the City of Fairfax
Evolving views about who and what should be memorialized in public spaces and on public land present an opportunity for the City of Fairfax to examine its nomenclature. Confederate-related street and place names, historical markers and monuments, and elements in the city seal will be discussed in the context of how these symbols reflect the City Council’s goals of inclusivity and building community.

City residents are invited to participate in thought-provoking conversations that connect current realities with the city’s historical past. Ultimately, through a series of listening and learning opportunities, the goal is to connect the present to a more equitable and inclusive future for all city residents, businesses, and visitors.

“This initiative, endorsed by the City Council, holds great promise for our city residents to engage with each other with respect, compassion, and an openness to learning and gaining a greater understanding of each other,” said City of Fairfax Mayor David Meyer. “This is an opportunity for all of us to discern what actions we may take to create a preferred future that is inclusive and more just and equitable.”

Partnership with George Mason University
To accomplish this work, the city has partnered with the George Mason University Jimmy and Rosalynn Carter School for Peace and Conflict Resolution. Working with the Carter School, the city has outlined a process to listen to community voices, engage the community in learning sessions and structured, facilitated discussions, and will form a diverse working group to make recommendations on action items and identify areas for further community discussion. City Council will consider the recommendations in 2021 before making decisions regarding the city’s nomenclature.

Please explore this project site, drop a pin on the map, share your ideas, tell your story, or leave a comment. Click on the social media icons to share with others.

UPDATE July 12, 2022: City Council voted to change 14 street names. Watch the meeting. If you would like to submit names for consideration, please complete the survey

Connecting Fairfax City for All

The City of Fairfax recognizes there is strength in diversity and acknowledges the need for a broader community conversation around the issues of racial and social equity, systemic racism, symbolism, and identity.

Confederate Lane and Plantation Pkwy signsNomenclature in the City of Fairfax
Evolving views about who and what should be memorialized in public spaces and on public land present an opportunity for the City of Fairfax to examine its nomenclature. Confederate-related street and place names, historical markers and monuments, and elements in the city seal will be discussed in the context of how these symbols reflect the City Council’s goals of inclusivity and building community.

City residents are invited to participate in thought-provoking conversations that connect current realities with the city’s historical past. Ultimately, through a series of listening and learning opportunities, the goal is to connect the present to a more equitable and inclusive future for all city residents, businesses, and visitors.

“This initiative, endorsed by the City Council, holds great promise for our city residents to engage with each other with respect, compassion, and an openness to learning and gaining a greater understanding of each other,” said City of Fairfax Mayor David Meyer. “This is an opportunity for all of us to discern what actions we may take to create a preferred future that is inclusive and more just and equitable.”

Partnership with George Mason University
To accomplish this work, the city has partnered with the George Mason University Jimmy and Rosalynn Carter School for Peace and Conflict Resolution. Working with the Carter School, the city has outlined a process to listen to community voices, engage the community in learning sessions and structured, facilitated discussions, and will form a diverse working group to make recommendations on action items and identify areas for further community discussion. City Council will consider the recommendations in 2021 before making decisions regarding the city’s nomenclature.

Please explore this project site, drop a pin on the map, share your ideas, tell your story, or leave a comment. Click on the social media icons to share with others.

Comments

Conversations about history, systemic racism, symbolism, and identity are difficult and complex. They can trigger passionate responses. As community members ask questions, share concerns, and engage in collective introspection, we encourage civil and respectful discourse. 

After you post your comment, please explore stories and ideas shared by other community members. Drop a pin on the map to identify areas for further study. 

Do you guys have nothing to do?

Gotyer 28 days ago

New street names should only be decided by residents on those streets and we should be reimbursed for any costs incurred by this mandatory name change.

Also, I am looking forward to further “engagement” and the much mentioned “healing process” that the mayor, city council and the non existent SAG have consistently mentioned. This has divided everyone and it has been done so poorly. Realistically only a certain HOA needed the change their name and three other streets, one of which no one lives on. This could have been done in a month. And those residents could have meet together in a meeting and selected a new name and then been given a rebate or discount on taxes.

But no, let’s take two years and spend literally hundreds of thousands to listen to a few selected people, most who do not live on any of these streets, while actively discounting the overwhelming opinion of residents who do not want to change anything at all.

On a side note, what is Ranger road park going to be named?

I live on the new Rangers Road 29 days ago

This is ridiculous. There was nothing wrong with the old names. By the way, Lee Highway was not even named after General Robert E. Lee. What a waste of taxpayers’ dollars.

Boris about 1 month ago

Removed by moderator.

The Revolting Blob about 1 month ago

Some time ago I left a post saying that I thought the path of greatest acceptance (and least disruption) was to change the names of only three specific streets in Mosby Woods: Plantation Parkway, Confederate Lane and Reb Street. I suggested changing Plantation Parkway to Proclamation Parkway, Confederate Lane to Conciliation Lane, and replacing Reb Street with a one-syllable rhyming name. Given Nasa's latest achievement, I now believe Webb Street would be appropriate.

Given that an apparently irreversible decision has now been made to change five other street names, I offer the following suggestions. My thinking on each of them should be obvious so I will refrain from any attempt at explanation:
-Change Ranger Road to Texas Road
-Change Raider Road to Oakland Road
-Change Scarlet Circle to Crimson Circle
-Change Singleton Circle to Doubleday Circle
-Change Traveler Street to Secretariat Street

Voilà

bernie218 about 1 month ago

Who will pay for all new documentation that requires home address; Council board members?

cacristi about 1 month ago

A total waste of taxpayer dollars

Gene about 1 month ago

I asked where does this ridiculousness end? Just taking down a statue, removing art, and changing names needs to stop. If you are against these things or don't like then that is your opinion you are welcome to create a statue that represents your side and have it placed next to the statue in question. You're welcome to leave your comment on art so that others can see your view. You're welcome to get on city council to name new streets to the names you wish to see but going back and changing things just because your assumptions are that the statue, the artist, the person, or the name represents something you don't want to see...??? That right there is a start of exactly what you think your preventing. The moment you reduce the amount of free speech, free will, and openness about past events, past people, past history is the moment you invite divisiveness forgetfulness and silence for debate that will inevitably lead to labeling and non communication, and persocution of the innocent which inevitably produces the same results from our past.

I am certainly not saying keep the things the same way they are today but labeling things and putting them into a box to forget about them it's not the way to move into a bright inclusive future for all of mankind!

QuaziOne about 1 month ago

I suggest the following names.

Snowflake Street
Safe Space Avenue
Feelings Over Facts Blvd.
Easily Offended Road
Orwell Avenue
Wasted Tax Payer Money Circle
Hurt Fee Fees Terrace
Intersectional Avenue
NewSpeak Street
Wrong Think Road
Echo Chamber Court
Pandering Place

Marcellus about 1 month ago

Really? Learn your history and stop the madness. Why are we so elitist that we hold people of history to our standards today. It’s ridiculous. If you erase history you are doomed to repeat it.

Stop erasing history about 1 month ago

Removed by moderator.

ThomasPaine about 1 month ago

Could we rename “Ranger Road” to “Ranger Street”?

Lotusjet about 1 month ago

I will be voting for Councilmember Yi at the next election. Enough said.

Kat about 1 month ago

Orwell’s 1984:A fictional warning, not a handbook for implementation.

Honoring Wasteful Public Servaants about 1 month ago

What about Robert E. Lee Drive in Hybla Valley?

Nemo about 1 month ago

As a pizza manager who has had to dispatch drivers to
" Plantation Parkway ", I applaud the effort to rename such streets. Fairfax has a lot to be proud of and many people who have lived here deserve to be honored, not enemy combatants who merely decamped or traipsed through the thickets that used to comprise our city.

MonAndesdrive about 1 month ago

I understand the concerns, but I'm not certain renaming ALL of these streets is necessary, abd might cause confusion.

jsinger78@gmail.com about 1 month ago

Has anyone looked at how Fairfax received its name? At some point there has to be a place of reasonableness as you could follow tangents for awhile.

If you change the name of Plantation Pkwy, will you drill down and forbid the term Plantation Shutters to be used in architectural codes?

Neighboring GWU is working to change The Colonials.

DSnow about 1 month ago

I was born in Fairfax in 1961 and have lived here my entire life. I would like to point out that the majority of these streets and roads in question were built and named within the last 100 years, and mostly in the 1960's. These are not historical streets, but named in defiant response to the civil rights movement. Context matters.

Cathy about 1 month ago

Please name a street after our lord and savior, General William Tecumseh Sherman. He was a brave man who knew how to properly put the south in its place.

Guy from FFX about 1 month ago